Kirsten Stolle


Pesticide Patty, 2011, gouache, graphite, collage on paper, 22 x 30 in.

Taylor’s Timmie, 2011, gouache, graphite and collage on paper, 15 x 22 in.

BAF 18, 2009, gouache, ink, graphite and collage on paper, 11 x 15 in.

BAF 18, 2009, gouache, ink, graphite and collage on paper, 10 x 13 in.

RoundUp Unready Rosie, 2011, gouache, graphite, collage on paper, 22 x 30 in.

Transgenic Corn Doll, 2011, gouache, graphite and collage on paper, 22 x 30 in.

Conopeum Carminatus, 2009, oil, acrylic, graphite, collage, wax on ragboard, 22 x 30 in.

Autobasidiomycetes 287, 2009, acrylic, ink, collage on found book page, 5 x 8 in.

Artist Statement

Over the past few years, I have been interested in creating abstractions based on natural and human forms. Root systems, topographical elements, bones, and biological diagrams are often suggested in my paintings. Allowing for multiple reference points, I reinterpret familiar forms through my personal language of mark making.

I began my career as a printmaker and as in printmaking, my painting process consists of layering and reworking the surface, building up each painting slowly. I manipulate wax, oils, and inks with hand-held and electric tools allowing each piece to develop a sense of history. While there is often some initial planning, the final surface is as much a result of chance as it is control.

I continually seek to achieve a balance between the painted object as is and the negative space surrounding it. Absence of marks is just as important as the mark itself, creating tension between each shape and the edge of the picture plane. Exaggerated weighted forms counterbalance open white areas. Improvisational renderings add an additional evolution to each piece. A sense of humor is added for good measure.

Typically I work in a series, as I like the continuity and connection from one painting to the next. It is important for me to explore my ideas and marks to the fullest, until I “understand” the marks and am no longer challenged or excited by them. I have an internal need to be visually satisfied. Once that is accomplished I know it’s time to move on and explore a new body of work.

Kirsten Stolle’s Website