Eric Finzi


EscapeIntoLife_Eric Finzi1A  Little Thing 1 , 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 12 x 12 in.

Dune, 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 31 x 41 in.

de Kooning and Friend 1, 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 12 x 14 in.

Make Up, 2011, epxoy resin and mixed media on wood, 41 x 54 in.

Cup of Tea, 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 37 x 37 in.

Whispers, 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 41 x 50 in.

Holding On, 2011, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 48 x 48

Untitled, Cafe Series 1, 2011,  epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 12 x 14 in.

I Thought You Knew, 2012, epoxy resin and mixed media on wood, 44 x 70 in.

About the Artist

Eric Finzi is a dermatological surgeon who uses syringes, propane torches and other nontraditional tools to create epoxy resin paintings.

Finzi is well aware that he’s in a unique pool of people who don’t fit into a singular right- or left-brained category; something he says has been “both a blessing and a curse” over the years.

“I found that if I only did one thing, the other half of my brain just wasn’t as satisfied,” he adds. “I think it’s more common than we’re led to believe, but some people can’t understand why I don’t want to do one thing all the time, and I can never quite explain it to them.” (Molly Petrilla)

Artist Statement

Working with epoxy resin is like trying to control chaos, thus providing a formative substance that might be characterized as born entropy. Resin painting is a type of performance art. There is also an element of danger added as the fumes are sweet but deadly. The process begins with the mixing of the resin and its catalyst; a chemical reaction ensues and time becomes an important dimension in the work. The painting is planned, like a play, with Act I, Act II, etc. The painting you see represents the summation of many layers of chemical reactions, all moving with their own velocity to a final polymerized end.

The challenge is to control the flow of resin using heat, cold, wind, gravity and viscosity as artistic tools. Syringes, needles and a propane torch are the resin painters brushes. The paintings are temperature dependent and exude an organicity that defies their inanimate status. The polymerized painting portrays its temporal history as it captures the slow flow of resin. These paintings continue to move after human hands have ceased to touch them. Their final destination can’t be known until a day after starting the painting , when all Brownian motion has ceased and the flecks of paint are trapped like a fly in amber.

The painting you see is the final scene of a moving picture whose history is encoded in layers of resin.

Eric Finzi’s Website

Eric Finzi at Sloane Fine Art Projects

Eric Finzi at  Divergence Fine Arts